The Exquisite Doctrine of the Kingdom

In Matthew 6. 33 Jesus said: "But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well".Modern society has reversed the divine order. In the world people begin by wanting wealth to obtain even more wealth. This is a perversion of the correct order. The best order is to seek the kingdom and all human concerns will be met by God.
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On Job

Today I finished preaching on the book of Job. The book definitely enriched my theological thoughts. Let me give you a brief summary of what I learned from Job in 8 weeks.First, the appropriate behaviour in suffering is not to yield to powerless resignation but to find a way of talking to God. This means that God’s people have a right to express their perplexity and pain. At some point, the Christian will cry out, as Jesus did: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Second, the people of faith need to be critical of accepting easy, theological solutions that lack human compassion. We have seen that during the cycle of interactions between Job and his friends, he kept challenging the foundations of their theological method: Job, your suffering must be the evidence of sin! This approach not only produced frustration with human beings but also promotes a distorted understanding of God. The consequence of using a one-directional approach with the problem of suffering is illustrated in Job 16:2 –6:“I have heard many things like these; you are miserable comforters, all of you! Will your long-winded speeches never end? What ails you that you keep on arguing? I also could speak like you, if you were in my place; I could make fine speeches against you and shake my head at you. But my mouth would encourage you; comfort from my lips would bring you relief.Job’s friends are competent theologians. But made they’re making situation worse by insisting that Job must accept and apply what they say. You see! There’s no room in their theology for a different perspective. But Job refuses to believe that the actions of God are controlled by the conclusions of his friends. So, Job has learned to accept adversity even though in some sections of the book he feels that God is playing games with him. But despite all that he keeps hoping in God. Finally, Job knows that God knows what he’s done. In 23:10 He said: When he had tested me, I will come forth as gold.This text is important. Here Job is saying that God knows everything within us. He knows what we’ve done. He knows what we’re doing and God ultimately knows what we’ll be strongly inclined to do in the future. Job didn’t understand the purpose of his test. He didn’t know how the trial would end either. But he knew that he was going to emerge from it and pass the test with flying colours. This feeling was overwhelming for him:When he had tested me, I will come forth as gold.Job looks inside himself and he realises that inside him there’s a combination of metals –things that God needs to deal with. And if God is putting him through extraordinary pressures in life and if God is supporting him with his power, this could only mean one thing: God intents to draw out worlds of potential inside him. This is what Job finally understood. He interpreted all the experiences that he was going through as flames of fire, circumstances for testing gold, situations to bring into the open what is dormant inside. He saw God sitting as the Refiner, supervising the process that would finally bring him out as gold. It’s important to keep in mind that the fires of the refiner don’t burn the essential, but only the alloy; the unwanted things. What emerges from this process then is an enriched personality. And all this was the outcome of a fuller understanding of God (see Job 42:1-6)
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On Psalm 81: 9 -10

This text tells us two things about God. First, the God of the Bible is the only God that can give us deliverance from oppressive situations. Second, God wants to give us more than what we have. This means that we should never think that we have enough from God. That is why God says to his people, “open wide your mouth and I will fill it” (v 10). God can do great things for us. He proved to Israel that he has power to do awesome things. What we need to do as his people is to believe God and ask for fullness. The Lord wants us to have large expectations of him because he is able to fill every want with plenty. The only limitation to the promise of God is our lack of faith. Our God is a God of overflowing grace, always ready to meet our need.
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Hallelujah & Vengeance in Revelation 19:1-8

In Revelation 19: 1-8 the Lord is praised by "a great multitude in heaven" for a very specific reason. The reason is underlined by the word "salvation" also found in 7:10 and 12:10. In the setting of the Apocalypse, salvation means that the will of God have come to earth to start something new. But this action of deliverance is connected with a terrible judgment -the condemnation of Babylon ( v. 2b). As in 16:7, God's judgements are welcomed and acknowledged as "true and just" (v. 2a). In verses 3 to 8 follows a response of joy, represented by celestial shouts of "Hallelujah", "Praise" and "Let us rejoice". If this is true, how can we rejoice in the will of God? How can we celebrate the Lord's salvation? In this text, John understands that God's salvific intervention is not complete until God executes his judgment on the Babylonian system that has "corrupted the earth by her adulteries", and until God has "avenged on her the blood of his servants". The longing of the angelic world is to see the earth under the rule of the Lord. The dilemma for Christian is how to connect the "Hallelujah" with the judgment of God. How do we do this? First, we should avoid the error of assuming that God's enemies must be treated as our enemies. The worshipping community is called to pray and to witness to God's enemies (Matthew 5:11 -12). Second, the text call us to recognise that God has a right to judge. Third, the church needs to remember that we are called to live in holiness, and this necessary implies opposing evil and the forces of evil that oppose God. Lastly, we need to remember that vengeance belongs to the Lord. He will do it righteously and perfectly. This is the motivation behind the “Amen” and “Hallelujah” of verse 4. We want to see all the earth under the rule of God. Christian communities, therefore, need to learn how to long for justice and the reign of God. The people of God are never interested in vengeance, or retaliation. Their concern is the full establishment of God’s kingdom.The NT categorically rejects the use of violence as a way of life. Lord, your kingdom come!
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Control vs Facilitation in Leadership

The fundamental difference is in the emotion under which one acts. In control one acts under the emotion of wanting things to happen that must correspond to what one expects. If what we expect to happen does not fit with what one wants, the controlling leader is strongly inclined to stop or reorient existing processes of organisation to impose personal expectations. In the action of facilitation, the leader operates under the emotion of cooperation. Leaders who are skilled at facilitating expect certain things to happen as well. But not according to what they want but according to what God wants. The leader who likes to control feels angry when a personal performance criterion is not satisfied. The controlling leader often produces tantrums to manipulate others. In the facilitation process, the reaction of leaders is curiosity and a genuine interest in providing guidance in order to achieve goals together. Controlling leadership creates resistance. Under the influence of excessive control people usually act to free themselves from it by moving out of range or finding ways to escape. A person under the influence of excessive control, may leave church, become a backslider, or avoid contact with the culture of control.
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Synod 2015 Minutes

For those who are interested, the Minutes of the 2015 PCEA Synod are now available on the website here.

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Biennial Camp update

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The Youth and Fellowship Committee have announced the main speaker for our Biennial Camp is going to be Rev. Andre Scheepers, Minister of our Ulverstone Congregation. Andre is going to be talking on the topic of The Gospel in Isaiah. We look forward to hearing the talks.  Applications will be available soon, so start planning now for a New Year's trip to the Biennial PCEA Camp.         
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Welcome

Welcome to the PCEA News page. This will, in time, DV (God Willing), become a place for News and views from Ministers and guest writers for everyone to read and reflect on. We look forward to your comments and hope you will find this useful and edifying. 

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